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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
and is a beautiful facility but more importantly there have been new routes added from europe and south america, direct service into las vegas and that opened up 50 markets in latin america for us and las vegas particularly the cosmopolitan really resonates. dennis: surprising given the fears of global recession that you're getting international guests. when i read about the hotel-casino is almost beside the point. it gets one line in a 13 line paragraph, you have a new ice skating rink. what is going on? >> the casino is a central part of las vegas and that is why people came here and continue to come here. 80% of people to las vegas game. that is an important segment of our business. that being said, what sets casinos and hotels apart are the other amenities. for us it is the guest rooms, residential style guest room with terraces where you can step out on your terrace and engage in las vegas and on the strip in a way that can't be done in other places. in the pool district where the ice rink opened a few weeks ago sits about 100 feet above the strips to you tonight skate and looked down at t
of miles away from where the end consumer is. how do you actually know what consumers let's say in south america, africa actually like in terms of fragrances? >> it's imminently linked to the culture of a local country. especially on the state side, especially on the flavor side. so we don't create fragrances and flavors for the indians and the chinese. we have 9,000 people around the world. half of them create the next fragrances and flavors. and out of those 4,500 people, you have roughly 2,000 people who are actually in those countries. they are local people so we are chinese employees, chinese favors, will create those fragrances and flavors for the whole market. because, again, you can't know about the local culture out of switzerland. so you have to by there. and we have there in all of those countries so we do expensive consumer tests. we do expensive consumer insight. we drive the trend and that's helpful to grow in those markets. >> another factor that's created a lot of headache is the strength. how difficult is it to be a globally operating company that's based here in switzer
not thrilled at the prospect of a reunified korea having south korea and america right across the river. this is an area where the chinese could tune themselves up a little. but clearly they are not in love with north korea. >> i can only say china is trying to encourage the transformation of korea and encouraging north korea to follow the same path china has engaged in in the last several, opening up their economy in china has been actively trying to establish free trade zones, encouraging other countries to establish operations in certain areas as a way to try to beef up the north korean economy and hope that that may lessen the isolation of north korea and therefore are influenced their foreign policy and some of their military policies. >> on the outside there. >> what about china's book, continental border with russia? what about china buying to siberia. i'm colonizing siberia, sending out some of these people -- how to separate the united states? how does that worry the united states? actually, china getting stronger unaccounted siberia? >> i haven't heard any proposals for china
should be worn in for a new six-year term in january. >> romo says this will move markets all over south america too. >> when you heard the announcement, a lot of people said it sounded like his good-bye. >> certainly did. >> 16 minutes past the hour. >>> extended look for our top stories, head to cnn.com/earlystart and twitter and facebook. search for early start cnn. >>> coming up this sunday on the next list, a successful arts studio, but he made his mark on the corporate world as cofounder of square. >> it allows small businesses to accept credit cards. his company worth billions. but he's still an artist at heart. >> art is what can't be proven mathematically, right? where science ends, the part that makes you feel good, but you don't know why. the way the object feels in your hand and looks, and if it's perfectly created, you can almost explain it to somebody else afterward. but in the creation part, you can't. you can see how glass is hon stantly moving. my job is to shape it. balance it at the same time. you can do that, you get these wonderful shapes. glass really rewards risk.
in european europe and hard in south africa and latin america but i think there is some hope that the dynamics can carry them through. >> the united states has to play an active leadership role rather than a passive leadership role. if the united states is passive and barack obama represents democratic ideas that it should be more passive this is the kind of world that results. i think places like egypt and even syria were looking to the united states to have a presence in this transition, but we have not seen the have and we're seen the results. >> paul: where is the potential of flash points? >> we don't talk about europe enough. the crisis in europe has not turned the corner. it's going to get dra mat kli worse. in portugal, spain, italy, there isening political dysfunction. that is going to encourage russia to make moves of its own. you mention south africa, south africa is not going in 'n a good direction. it was supposed to be the most optimistic spot. maybe new zealand but somebody told me they are heading south. >> paul: coming down to obamacare. big changes may be coming for 2013 for
. chief justice john roberts. great can conservative goes south on obamacare breaking the hearts of conservatives all over america. >> what did he do. >> ? he voted for obamacare, to uphold it as constitutional and he said it was a tax. not a fee. >> well, it needs more clarification. >> south carolina senator jim demint, who is resigning his senate seat and becoming the president of the heritage foundation, which in effect is an admission that the tea party forces where he was their mentor and benefactor, that they are a spent force in the senate at least. >> what kind of a salary does that job have? >> a million plus with a little financial incentive. >> a million bucks a year. >> that has nothing to do withth him going over there, though? >> i think it has something to do with it. >> i would say the abandonment by this administration of a 30-year ally. namely, mubarak in egypt in such a way that it lost and undermine the confidence of the entire arab world in the loyalty and credibility of america as an ally. >> i put morsy in there. >> i did. >> it goes to president obama fro
but starting today anyone with a phone in key emerging markets in india and south america and australia can sign up and it will roll out worldwide including here in the u.s. becky? >> julia, thank you very much. we'll be watching all that as it comes out later today. >>> let's talk consequences of the fiscal cliff. companies of announces dividends in recent days trying to avoid the tax hikes set to kick in at the end of the year. who is really making money on this? >> a lot of people especially ceos more than 110 companies have announced special dividends in the fourth quarter alone that's more than three times last year's fourth quarter. the reason? the fiscal cliff. if we go off the cliff tax rates on dividends could go from 15% to more than 43%. companies are racing to beat the tax hikes by paying dividends before december 31st and some of the biggest beneficiaries, both insiders and ceos. mickey arison is getting $89 million from carnival giving him a potential tax savings. and larry elison is getting savings around $56 million. thomas frist at hca is getting around $350 million, saving
, and south america, which we really don't have now. really makes us a global powerhouse. >> you know, is the underwear business and the jeans business a bigger business than the suit business for example? >> yes. the underwear business worldwide is over a billion dollars in sales and jeans business is close to $2 billion. so those are the two largest categories followed by fragrance which is about a billion and a half dollars. >> when you did the tommy deal you knocked the cover off the ball. you put some numbers out. you delevered the company quickly. now you're back doing the warnerco deal. is this going to be as transformational? >> i think in some ways it's going to be more transformational. it really opens up two key markets for us to operate directly. today we are operating on joint ventures and licensing arrangements. so in asia, china specifically, ind india, and in latin america with brazil, you know, really opening up the developing economies, where warnaco, in those two areas approaching 20%. >> phillips-van heusen, to be able to transform it from what we think of when we
that on the state level. there are 30 republican governors today in america, the republicans actually picked up a governorship in north carolina so that south now is almost entirely republican, whereas just 25 years ago, it was pretty entirely democratic. and it's not just the south. states like-- >> what are they doing with that power, that's the interesting thing. >> so, they have the power and they are actually using it, af got states like kansas, and florida that have been cutting taxes aggressively to promote jobs. you've got a lot of the states in the mountain states that are republican, where they're aggressively promoting pro energy drilling policies to get at the national resources and of course, the big story that you mentioned, paul, is what's happening with right to work, it wasn't just michigan, sometimes we forget earlier indiana became a right to work state, too, so, two midwestern states that have traditionally been pretty heavily unionized moved to right to work and i wouldn't be surprised if next year we see a couple more states fall. >> interesting contrast in maryland and vi
. that average has fallen 10 cents in just the past week. the lowest state average in america, missouri, $2.95 a gallon. tennessee, south carolina, oklahoma, they could fall below $3 in the next couple of days. all right, big deal. that puts money into the economy, by the way. so let's go to mcdonald's -- let's not go to mcdonald's. let's go to nicole to talk about mcdonald's. the mcrib is back? nicole: either way i would go to mcdonald's with you. the mcrib is traditionally a great product for mcdonald's. launches their season. this barbecue pork sandwich has a following, stuart. they are introducing it once again now this holiday season. they have been doing well with the breakfast. they have been doing well with low-priced offerings in europe. there's a lot of high hope -- high hope on the mcrib. stuart: just doing it for december, is that correct? nicole: i think that's correct. i want to double check. i'm hesitant to say it wholeheartedly. i think that's correct. stuart: you haven't checked, in other words. you haven't been down to mcdonald's and checked? all right, you said enough. ni
, lebanese border, gaza in the south and egypt and sinai are fighting israel and shelling israel. if we come back to israel's aid it is very bad for israel and america at the same time. melissa: a lot of people said when the arab spring was coming to fruition, this was a wonderful day and new day for democracy in the middle east. there were a few voices at that time said hang on, the guys coming in to replace them are even mored are call than what we saw. this is actually moving in the opposite direction than you think. how did that happen? why did hat happpn because it is continuing? >> because america and president obama's administration ignored the warning signs and what the muslim brotherhood and what radicals are about. when president obama first became president and he went to egypt and gave his first address, his first speech in cairo, in egypt, he made it a point to invite the muslim brotherhood to the chagrin of the mubarak regime. he insisted that the muslim brotherhood would be sitting in two front seats addressing his speech. that gave them a importance in power gaining respect
not be doing any apologizing. >> brian: just think about this, how could you be any prominent south korean and not be thankful to the americans for what we've done for that country that, country would not exist without america. for him to say those brutal words back in mid 2000, i think is inexcusable. should have been canceled. >> gretchen: not only that, but it's mostly americans probably buying his music. so we've he contributed to him becoming very rich. coming up on "fox & friends," a law allowing our government to eavesdrop on your phone calls set to expire this month. sounds like a good thing? maybe not. >> steve: want your kids to finally think you're cool? there is a way. pro skateboard legend tony hawk here to explain. all you got to do is open your wallet. be right back. there's the sign to the bullpen. here he comes. you wouldn't want your doctor doing your job, the pitch! so why are you doing his? whoa! only your doctor can determine if your persistent heartburn is actually something more serious like acid reflux disease. over time, stomach ac can damage the lining of your eso
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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